Messages from the aether: Hearing God’s call

We are the sheep called to be good shepherds
http://dailytheology.org/2015/04/26/we-are-the-sheep-called-to-be-good-shepherds/

Katherine Greiner reflects on the image of Jesus as the Good Shepherd, and its importance to her and her faith. She talks about how this image of Jesus can inform our lives as Christians, caring for the world as the shepherd cares for the sheep.

Lead gently, Lord, and slow
http://www.lindsayhardinfreeman.com/lead-gently-lord-and-slow/

In this sermon, Episcopal minister Rev Lindsay Hardin Freeman talks about finding God, and being found by God. She reflects on the stories of Samuel and Nathaniel, and how they answered the call of God, and what they can teach us about listening for, and responding to, God’s call.

Power to the powerless
http://benclapton.id.au/2015/08/30/power-to-the-powerless/

A powerful sermon from Captain Ben Clapton, where he talks about his involvement in a Love Makes A Way action and Jesus’ call to fight for the oppressed and powerless, which led to him being arrested whilst protesting to free refugee children out of detention.

Answering God’s call to Malawi
http://www.waterfortheworld.com/Abundant_Life/Answering_God’s_Call_to_Malawi/

In this article, Steven Uhde recounts his story about how he came to work for New Life International, spurred on by a desire to find a way to bring water purification to Aaron Village in Malawi. Answering God’s call to work in Malawi has brought his life many blessings.

Laura Clapton

 

Moderator’s column: First the call, then where?

Walker Percy once wrote, “you can get all straight A’s and still flunk life.”

Somehow we fail at life if we are unable to discover its, and our own, meaning. Deep in our hearts most of us want to find and fulfil a purpose bigger than ourselves. Kierkegaard, a Christian philosopher, put it this way: “the thing is to understand myself, to see what God really wants me to do.”

We live in a time when we have too much to live with and too little to live for. Having lots of possessions and people in our lives still leaves a gap; a longing for something more, a sense of purpose and a sense of call. Continue Reading

Editorial: Hearing God’s call

In the last couple of months we’ve seen a number of events in the news which stirred a lot of emotions – one of the biggest stories possibly being the terror attacks in Paris which left one hundred and thirty people dead and many more injured.

As Facebook feeds filled with profile pictures in support of people in France, we were also reminded that similar attacks are happening all around the world – with less media coverage and or concern. Arguments flared online about why this is the case, from accusations of racism to acknowledgement that people feel more of a connection to a place that they may have travelled to.

As this played out, we can surely be reminded that we live in a hurting world.Continue Reading

The essence of the call

In the lead-up to the first Christmas, it’s said that some wise men and a group of shepherd’s followed a call from God to a manger in Bethlehem. There they would visit a beautiful newborn baby who was born to change the world. There are many Biblical references to God’s call on our lives. But what does it mean to feel God’s call? And how do you know if you’re living it out? It’s one of life’s biggest questions and it’s a constantly evolving journey.

Rev Michelle Cook, presbytery minister for mission development in the Uniting Church Presbytery of Tasmania, spends her days helping people to figure out where God is calling them. Michelle will be the keynote speaker at next year’s Summer Spirit event, held in Perth in February. Through workshops, discussion and reflection, Michelle will lead some big conversations on how finding out more about ourselves can help us to understand who and where God is calling us to be. Continue Reading

Coral Richards on life and service

For Coral Richards education is more than a job; it’s a vocation. Born into a family of teachers, and as a high school teacher herself, Coral said that, while growing up, every moment was an opportunity to learn. “Teaching for my parents was a vocation,” she said. “Every opportunity was an opportunity to teach in our family when we were growing up. Everything was a learning experience.”

This year, due to budget cuts, Coral has moved from tutoring into a full teaching load, teaching English, careers and art at Coodanup College in Mandurah. For the past eight years she has worked as an Aboriginal tutor and family liaison officer at the school, which has 20% Indigenous population. She will, in part, return to this role in the new year. Coral has also worked for 15 years as a Primary Extension and Challenge (PEAC) teacher, supporting academically gifted children in years five and six.Continue Reading